Blog

7th February 2017

Firstcall’s Cornucopia of Film

In the last few years, not only have films have been discontinued, but new ones exist and have mainly come from independent suppliers like Fotoimpex and Maco from Germany and Lomography in Austria.

We now offer over 170 films in our company from 14 different vendors.

Read the article and then if you want to order film this month use the code FCFILMFEB and you'll get 10% off any film we sell.

 

Black-and-white films now offer so-called variants in coloured creative films.

Left: Recording on the tried and tested Kodak Tri-X film (by Ronald Vedrilla). Right: With creative films such as the Rollei Crossbird film, you can achieve interesting picture effects. Here the cross-developed negative on coloured paper was positively enlarged with hard contrasts and strong colours.

Slide film decline

In 2009, there was worldwide mourning when Kodachrome 64 became the last film type of this famous colour film family following the previous demise of Ektachrome and Elite Chrome films. In 2003, the Solaris Chrome 100 was the last slide film from Ferrania. However, there is new hope that the managers of the new “Film Ferrania” will be able to produce a colour reversal film by using the former ScotchChrome again. In the Spring of 2015, the first 500 slide films from “Film Ferrania” were sold to crowd funders.

Fujifilm is still the only manufacturer of colour slide film, if only professional ones, i.e. without Fujichrome Sensia but now without Fujichrome Provia 400X and Fujichrome T64 Professional. Fujifilm has also given up its last Fujicolor FP-100C Professional release sheet film. So there are only integral films like Impossible Project.

Many colour negative films are still available from Fujifilm. Top row: Fujicolor Superia 200, X-TRA 400 and Superia 1600. Bottom row: Also the popular colour-intensive Fujichrome Velvia 50 slide film has remained in the assortment. 

Typical contrast reproduction of Kodak colour negative films: left Ektar 100 with saturated colours, right Portra 160 with low contrast, recommended for portraits.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Some films, live on with new pack contents. A typical example of this is the Agfa CT Precisa 100 slide film, which is no longer a residual stock from Leverkusen but a Fujichrome Sensia 100. There is no longer the original film, but its sensitivity class resembles the Fujichrome Provia 100F. 

 

 Competitive, inexpensive slide films include the Rolleichrome CR200 (first and the second photo from the left) and AgfaPhoto CT Precisa 100 (third and fourth photo from the left). CT Precisa has slightly stronger colours and a reddish facial tone. The CR 200 works softer with warm colour reproduction.

The CR200 (and similar others) is a “frozen product” from the earlier production and preserved by AgfaPhoto GmbH, Leverkusen, from autumn 2005. They were for sale by Agfa-Gevaert, Mortsel (Belgium) as Aviphot aerial film and are therefore on polyester underlay (PET).

Black and white films are still going strong!

Harman Technology, Kodak and Foma Bohemia produce a large number of different black and white films, with Harman, owners of both Ilford and Kentmere films. Foma and Harman also supply distribution companies such as Adox (see table). Fujifilm only produces the Acros 100 film now.

Black and white photography is very popular among young photographers. It allows a lot of creativity through the variety of films and developers and offers the advantage of a secure long-term archiving. Therefore black and white films are available from well-known and new brands in large volumes. In contrast to colour films, we find special materials also still available such as infrared and high-resolution films. However, the fact that photographers still use black-and-white films and achieve outstanding picture quality with special developers, chemistry manufacturers, like Tetenal or Adox, have great merit too.

Different crystal shapes and film supports

The silver halide crystals contained as light-sensitive building blocks in the film layers form as cubic or tabular. In the latter, they have a certain shape and are patented as "T-Grains" by Kodak. Kodak and Fujifilm both offer these T-Grain type films whereas modern Ilford Delta films contain mixed crystals. Their FP4 Plus and HP5 Plus are proven classics differ in construction but it is their graininess that is popular with many photographers.

The so-called classic films have single or double layers. Their advantages are: they are robust, can handle different light situations (exposures) and developers better. As single-layer films, they are less vulnerable to stray light than multi-layered modern films, but should not be overexposed. Also, thanks to their silver richness, you achieve a good tonal range from white to black and high maximum densities. Also, they are very sharp. Low film sensitivities (ISO 25-50) also offer a very fine grain. Higher sensitivity film nearly always suffers from being more grainy. For the classic film, we always recommend development by hand.

In the case of modern film emulsions, excellent fine-grain is the main focus, especially in small-format films. It is thanks to the dominance of colour film technologies. These films are also more hardened, but in sharpness, contrast range and shadow sketch partial to the classic films. These film types develop better in rotary and continuous process machines.

The tried-and-tested film base is triacetate, the modern ones, which are used in films for home aerial photography and repro photography, but also for conventional recordings, is polyester (PET). The latter has the advantage of being clear, which is why you can use these films as slide film (see below). Also, the polyester film base ensures tear strength, high dimensional stability and long-term stability.

Film and colour sensitivity

The differences in the sensitization of black-and-white films concern the chemical, i.e., the film sensitivity, and the optical, i.e., the colour sensitivity, and thus the tonal value conversion in the image. The film sensitivity is not an absolute value, but only a guideline for a standard development, because a different sensitivity utilisation is achieved depending on the developer used. Not only a low film sensitivity means fine grain and thus a great ability to enlarge the negatives. It’s especially true for high-resolution films, which are well suited for technical applications and experiments. Optically, most films are sensitised panchromatically. They reflect the brightness values of nature very well.

 

Orthochromatic films are not sensitive to red, so the brick building appears black in the left image. On the right a picture with a panchromatic film that is sensitive to all colours (pictures: Ronald Vedrilla)

The ortho-panchromatic films have a better tonal value transmission by balancing the over-sensitivity of panchromatic films of red. Orthochromatic films are red-sensitive and work harder. The sensitivity of infrared films reaches into the area of high wavelengths that is invisible to the eye. This is also the case, in part, for super panchromatic films, which have an extended red sensitivity.

Infrared films to photograph beyond the visible spectrum, there are still: Left of the Ilford SFX200 with increased red sensitivity and red filter, on the right the Rollei infrared film from Rollei with an infrared filter. The chlorophyll effect is typical: leaf green becomes white. Photos: Ronald Vedrilla

 

Suitable for black and white slides

Black and white slides can be attractive because of their plastic appearance with a beautiful gradation of their tonal values. The new Adox Scala 160 BW film, which replaces Agfa Scala 200X is our suggestion for obtaining black and white slides.

The Rollei films IR400 (left) and Superpan 200 (right) are ideally suited for reversal development.

Adox Scala 160 is recommended for processing by Photostudio 13 in Leinfelden-Echterdingen (Germany). The full list of film processed as slide films, by Photostudio 13, is available at www.photostudio13.de.

Instant films by Impossible and Fujifilm

The field of use of instant film ranges from party snapshots to full creative images. Impossible Project, with the acquired Polaroid factory in Enschede (Netherlands), has succeeded in improving its instant colour film in the last five years.

Typical instant picture formats for which are newly produced by Impossible (top row) and still by Fujifilm (bottom row) instant pictures. Above left: Film for Image and Image cameras, top right: Film for Polaroid SX 70. Bottom row: Fujicolor Instax wide-screen format.

In the meantime, a considerable range of colour and black-and-white films are offered for the SX-70, Image and other Polaroid cameras, after Polaroid had abandoned film production in 2008. Recently Impossible Project has even launched its new camera with the model I-1. The Impossible range has been expanded to include creative designs. Thus, unlike Polaroid before, there are films with coloured frames and even round images with different frames (picture frame). The table does not list all the versions of the picture frames since they are subject to change. Fujicolor Instax films, and their cameras, often delight amateur party goers with their offering of a smaller picture format.

 

Cinematic film adapted for 35mm use

The new CineStill films from the USA, come as daylight film 50 Daylight Xpro or 800 Tungsten Xpro. This 800 ISO film means the higher-sensitivity artificial light film is again available. The CineStill films are made from a cinema film produced by Kodak as Vision3 50D film 5203 and Vision 800T 5289 films.

Cinematic material is also suitable for photography. A colour negative film (CineStill 800Tungsten) for recording with artificial light.

The vision films, further improved, have emerged from Eastman Color. The 50Daylight has very fine grain. According to the American Wright brothers, the exposure margin of the CineStill 800Tungsten is ISO 200/24 ° to IS0 3200/36 °. By removing the black back layer in an alkaline bath, the CineStill films have conventional C-41 development.

Incorrect colours and intended mistakes

Lomography, Maco and above all the company Revolog, founded by former photographers in Vienna in 2009, offer many so-called creative films. The Lomography RedScale and Rollei Redbird are the red-sensitive layer upwards spooled films. The yellow filter layer, which serves to turn off the blue light beams for the green and red sensitive layers, is located  below the blue-sensitive layer. The blue layer is, therefore, missing on the yellow-red images.

 

Alienated Colours: On the left a picture with the Lomography RedScale and on the right one with the Rollei Redbird

For the images from the RedScale and Redbird to appear in a faithful altered colour, they must not be corrected for colour balance during processing. For minilabs, therefore, a certain caution is advised, and the yellow-red pronouncements should not be corrected.

Lomography also sells altered slide film with its LomoChrome films: "The special emulsion makes for a colour shift: the result is not only strong blue and violet tones. Turquoise shifts the blue to orange and gold tones and vice versa, so the sky is also orange. The Purple colour turns purple and vice versa. Depending on the exposure, Adox Color Implosion Film alienates the captured subjects in the direction of warm-to-yellowish or cold-bluish, pale or strong. The film material for this is first artificially aged in the heating cabinet and then pre-exposed in colour.

The Rollei Digibase CN 200 provides negatives as an unmasked colour negative film with complementary colours, as well as good black-and-white copying. Its colour rendering is more brilliant than in previous films without colour masking.

Cross-development in C-41

The Rollei Crossbird film is identical to the Rolleichrome CR 200 but is intended for development in the colour negative process C-41. This so-called cross-development produces hard negatives, which are used either as false colour dyes or for coloured paper images in negative or positive colours. Crossbird slides show intense negative colours with a stronger contrast.

Images of three films for comparison: On the upper left the negative Rollei Crossbird, on the right beside the conventional Kodak Gold 200. Bottom left the positive copy of the Crossbird and on the right an alienated image of the Rollei Redbird.

For example, red becomes blue-green and plant green - very similar to the previous Ektachrome Infrared Film from Kodak - unfortunately no longer produced.

Skin shades appear blue. The negative slides can be projected or scanned. When making paper images, make sure that you develop as if they were from a normal slide, i.e., the negative colours. If on the other hand, you develop the images as if they were negative, they show positive colours, but are very contrasty and coarse-grained.

The colour negative films of Revolog show extraordinary image effects, such as partially wrong colours in "Kolor" (left) or flashes of light in Tesla1 (right). (Photos: Revolog)

Revolog colour films are afflicted with the "errors" described in our table. To do this, they manipulate Kodak ColorPlus films by hand through pre-exposure. These results are loved by amateur experimenters and artistic (fashion and portrait) professionals.

The future of the film market

Black and white films were never affected in the way colour film declined, and now, colour film is seeing growth again. The new creative film can be replicated with image processing software, but that is missing the point. Analogue film users take pictures this way for the sake of passion, curiosity or creative experience. It's about the fun when something unusual is developed.

Impossible, Fujifilm, Lomography and Leica have entered the instant picture market. Fujifilm has also introduced the black and white monochrome film and a new square format (62 x 62 mm) film.

Rollei Chrome 320 film will take the place of CR200 as it runs out. This daylight film, with a higher sensitivity, will be well sought-after.

The Italian manufacturer, Six Gates Films, will be delivering packaged Kodak Vision3 cine films with the black back sheet not removed, as it is in the similar CineStill.

 

The new "Vision Cinema Pro" is hand-assembled by the Italian manufacturer Six Gates Film

His means they mean processing in Kodak’s ECN-2 process.

The JCH Street Pan 400 probably originates from the cold store of Agfa-Gevaert and should have been originally designed for the traffic monitoring with its increased red sensitivity (photo: Ars-Imago)

Japan Camera Hunter, supplies the JCH Street Pan 400 film. They are hand wound too.

 Our Summary of all film currently available

Film type

Art

ISO

Manufacturing

Remarks

Adox Fotowerke (DE)

Adox CHS 100 II

SW

100

135-36, 120, 4x5 "-20x24"

Film with classical imaging and differentiated lights. Clear PET backing with back coating for high sharpness. Available from October 2016

Adox CMS 20 II Prof.

SW

12

135-36, 4 × 135-36, 120,         4 × 120, 4 × 5 ", 30.5 m

Extremely high-resolution orthochromatic thin-film, film on a clear PET base, also available in packs of four with Adotec III developer, exposure as a negative film such as ISO 12 as a slide film such as ISO 16-20

Adox Color Implosion

CD

NOTE:

135-36

Creative film, with exposure at ISO 400 weak brownish-green colours and strong grain, with exposure as ISO 100 yellowish to red colour

Adox Scala 160 BW

SW

160

135-36

New slide film, replaced Agfa Scala 200X with finer grain, high silver application and high contrast range, can be developed in the Fomapan-R set

Adox Silvermax 100 NEW

SW

100

135-36, 30.5m

Panchromatic film with high silver content on a clear triacetate backing, up to 14 levels in the Silver-Max developer, as slide film with warm image tone

 

Wephota (USA)

Wephota FO 5

SW

2.5

4 × 5 "-40 × 50 cm, DIN and inch formats

Orthochromatic film for negatives to special printing processes (eg cyanotype and impression)

Wephota NP 15

SW

25

6.5 x 9 cm, 4 x 5 ", 5 x 7"

Classic film, corresponds to Rollei RPX 25

Wephota NP 22

SW

100

6.5 x 9-18 x 24 cm and inch formats

Classic film, produced by Foma Bohemia (SZ)

Wephota NP 27

SW

400

6.5 x 9 cm, 8 x 10 "

Classic film, equivalent to Rollei RPX 400

Wephota Ortho 25

SW

25

135-36, 120, 6.5 x 9 cm, 8 x 10 "

Orthochromatic film with fine granularity

 

Bergger (FR)

BRF 400 plus

SW

400

135-36

Recommended for recording with artificial light, pushable up to ISO 800

Pancro 400

SW

400

4 × 5 ", 8 × 10"

Double layer film with large exposure margin, on clear PET base, 135-36 (on acetate) and 120 (on PET) in preparation

 

Filmotec (DE)

Orwo UN 54

SW

100

30.5 m

Cine-film, also for the slide film developable (Orwo regulation 4185)

Orwo N 74 plus

SW

400

30.5 m

Improved double-layered film

 

Foma Bohemia (CZ)

Fomapan 100
Classic

SW

100

135-36, 120, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film

Fomapan 200 creative

SW

200

135-36, 120, 9x12cm, 4x5 ", 8x10", 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film

Fomapan 400 action

SW

400

135-36, 120, 9x12cm, 4x5 ", 8x10", 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film

Retropan 320 soft

SW

320

9x12cm, 4x5 ", 8x10", 17m, 30.5m

A new film with soft contrasts and wide exposure latitude

 

Fotoimpex (DE)

CHM 100 Universal

SW

100

135-36

Manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB), Kentmere Film

CHM 400

SW

100

135-36

Manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB), Kentmere Film

CineStill 50 Daylight Xpro C-41

CN

50

135-36, 120

Kodak Vision 3 Kinofilm 50D conforms to daylight, but is suitable for process C-41

CineStill 800 Tungsten Xpro C-41

CN

800

135-36

Kodak Vision 3 Kinofilm 500T is suitable for daylight, but suitable for process C-41

New55

SSB

-

5x 4x5 films

Positive, Negative Films for Polaroid Backs 545

 

Fujifilm (JPN)

FP 100C Professional

COD

800

10 images (8.5 × 10.8 cm)

Production stopped.

Fujichrome Provia 100 Professional (RDPIII)

CD

100

135-36, 5x120, 4x5 ", 8x10"

Very fine grained slide film

Fujichrome Velvia 50 Professional (RVP50)

CD

50

135-36, 5x120

Especially colour screen film

Fujichrome Velvia 100 Professional (RVP100)

CD

100

135-36, 5x120

Especially colour screen film. 4 × 5 "

Fujicolor C 200

CN

200

2 × 135-36

Production stopped

Fujicolor Instax mini instant film

COD

800

2 × 10 pictures
(6.2 x 4.6 cm)

For Instax mini cameras, with white, coloured or designed edges

Fujicolor Instax Wide Instant Film

COD

800

2 × 10 pictures
(6.2 x 9.9 cm)

For Instax 210 and Fuji Instax wide cameras

Fujicolor PRO 160NS

CN

160

5 × 120, 4 × 5 "

With medium contrast, portrait film
Production stopped. Stock clearance sale (Aug. 2016)

Fujicolor PRO 400H 800 (CH)

CN

400

135-36, 5x120

With fourth colour layer to avoid colour stain with fluorescent tubes (Reala technology)

Fujicolor Superia 200 (CA)

CN

200

135-24, 3 × 135-24, 135-36, 3 × 135-36, 5 × 135-36

Production stopped.

Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 400 (CH)

CN

400

135-36

 

Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 800 (CH)

CN

800

135-36

With fourth colour layer to avoid colour stain with fluorescent tubes (Reala technology)
Production stopped.

Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 1600 (CU)

CN

1600

135-36

A high-speed colour film with a fourth colour layer to avoid colour stain with fluorescent tubes (Reala technology). Production stopped.

Instax mini film
Monochrome
(CU)

SSB

800

10 pictures 6.2 x 4.6 cm

New black and white film for Instax mini cameras

Neopan Acros

SW

100

135-36, 5x120

Especially fine-grained film with flat silver crystals

 

Harman Technologies (GB)

Ilford Delta 100 Professional

SW

100

135-24, 135-36, 120, 4x5 ", 30.5m

With flat triple structure crystals, roll film because of clear underlay to the reverse winding (Agfa Scala process), while warm black tone

Ilford Delta 400 Professional

SW

400

135-24, 135-36, 120, 30.5m

With flat triple-crystal crystals, can be exposed to ISO 1600, roll film is suitable for a clear underlay to the reverse winding (Agfa Scala process), while warm black tone

Ilford Delta 3200 Professional

SW

3200

135-36, 120

Layer film with three-layer structure crystals, still fine-grained, basic sensitivity ISO 1000, pushable up to ISO 12'500

Ilford FP4 Plus

SW

125

135-24, 5x135-24, 135-24, 135-36, 5x135-36, 10x135-36, 9x12cm, 4x5 ", 8x10", 17m, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film, particularly fine-grained, as ISO 80 to 200 can be exposed

Ilford HP5 Plus

SW

400

135-24, 5 × 135-24, 10 × 135-24, 135-36, 5 × 135-36, 10 × 135-36, 9 × 12 cm, 4 × 5 ", 8 × 10"

A classical panchromatic film with high resolution and good shadow transmittance, as can be exposed to ISO 200 to 3200

Ilford Orthoplus

SW

NOTE:

4 × 5 ", 8 × 10"

Orthochromatic film, sensitivity ISO 80 for daylight and ISO 40 for artificial light images

Ilford Pan F Plus

SW

50

135-36, 120, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film, extremely fine-grained

Ilford SFX 200

SW

200

135-36, 120

With extended red range up to 780 nm for infrared-like images

Ilford XP2 Super

SW

400

135-34, 135-36, 120, 30.5m

Very fine colour green, development in colour process C-41, can be exposed like ISO 50 to 800, best quality at ISO 400

Kentmere 100

SW

100

135-24, 135-36, 30.5m

Cheap classic movie

Kentmere 400

SW

400

135-24, 135-36

Cheap classic movie

 

Impossible Project (DE / NL)

B & W 600 2.0

SSB

640

8 pictures (7.9 × 7.9cm)

For Polaroid 600 and Impulse cameras, also available for pictures with a black frame

B & W for 8 × 10 cameras and backs

SSB

640

10 Negative + 10 Positive 8 × 10 "

For 8 × 10 instant photo cameras as well as Polaroid back and processor

B & W movie
For I-Type

SSB

640

 

For new Impossible Camera I-1

B & W for Image & Spectra

SSB

640

8 pictures (9 × 7.3 cm)

For Polaroid Image and Spectra cameras

B & W SX-70

SSB

640

8 pictures (9 × 7.3 cm)

For Polaroid SX-70 camera

Color film
For I-Type

COD

640

8 pictures (7.9 x 7.9 cm)

For new Impossible Camera I-1

Instant Color for Image and Spectra

COD

640

8 pictures (7.3 × 9.1 cm)

For Polaroid Image and Spectra cameras

Instant Color for Polaroid 600 and Impulse

COD

640

8 pictures (7.9 x 7.9 cm)

For Polaroid 600 and Impulse camera, also for round pictures with white, black, silver or coloured frame

SX Color

COD

400

8 pictures (7.9 x 7.9 cm)

For Polaroid SX-70, also for pictures with a silver frame

 

Kodak Alaris (GB / D)

Kodak ColorPlus

CN

200

135-24, 135-36

Cheap 35mm basic film

Kodak Gold 200 (GB)

CN

200

135-24, 135-36

 

Kodak Professional 320TXP (Tri-X)

SW

320

4 × 5 ", 5 × 7"

According to 400TX, but on Estar ThickBase (thick underlay), roll film can be retouched on both sides

Kodak Professional 400TX (Tri-X)

SW

400

135-24, 135-36, 5x120, 30.5m

Classic film with wide exposure margin, pushable up to ISO 1600/33 °, roll film retouchable on the back

Kodak Professional Ectar 100

CN

100

135-36, 5x120, 4x5 "

Strong colour saturation, very fine grain and wide exposure latitude

Kodak Professional Portra 160

CN

160

5 × 135-36, 5 × 120, 4 × 5 ", 8 × 10"

A portrait film with soft contrasts

Kodak Professional Portra 400

CN

400

5 × 135-36, 5 × 120, 4 × 5 ", 8 × 10"

Portrait film with for the high sensitivity fine grain

Kodak Professional Portra 800

CN

800

135-36, 5x120

 

Kodak Professional
T-Max 100

SW

100

135-24, 135-36, 4x5 ", 30.5m

With tabular silver crystals, fine-grained film of its sensitivity class, extremely sharp

Kodak Professional
T-Max 400
(TMY-2)

SW

400

135-24, 135-36, 4x5 ", 30.5m

With tabular silver crystals, fine-grained and sharp film of its sensitivity class

Kodak Ultra Max 400

CN

400

135-24, 135-36

 
 

Leica Camera AG (DE)

Leica Instant Color

COD

800

10 pictures (6.2 x 4.6 cm)

For the new Leica Instant Camera, manufactured by Fujifilm (Instax mini)

Leica Instant B & W

SSB

800

10 pictures (6.2 x 4.6 cm)

For the new Leica Instant Camera, manufactured by Fujifilm (Instax mini)

 

Lomographic Society (AT)

Earl Gray

SW

100

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

Panchromatic film with a large tonal range, soft contrasts

Efke B & W

SW

25

135-36

 

Efke R 50

SW

50

120

With high resolution

KONO! Danube

CN

6

3 × 135-36

Creative colour negative film for long-lasting exposures

KONO! Recorder BW

SW

100- 200

3 × 135-36

Hand-rolled, high-contrast document film ("reanimated" film film material)

KONO! Coloring 125T

CN

100

3 × 135-36

Hand-rolled artificial light film for bluish-tinted photos in daylight or neutral in artificial light («reanimated» film film material)

KONO! Color 400T

CN

400

3 × 135-36

Hand-rolled artificial light film for bluish-tinted photos in daylight or neutral in artificial light («reanimated» film film material)

Lady Gray

SW

400

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

Panchromatic film

LomoChrome Purple XR100-400

CN

100-400

5 × 135-36, 10 × 135-36, 15 × 135-36, 5 × 120, 10 × 120, 15 × 120

Creative negative colour film with prominent purple shades and lilac green tones

LomoChrome Turquoise

CN

100-400

10 x 135-36, 15x 135-36, 20x135, 5x120, 10x120, 15x120, 20x120

A creative colour negative film with shades of blue shifted to orange

Lomography B & W ORCA

SW

100

110-24, 3 × 110-24

 

Lomography Color Negative 100

CN

100

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

 

Lomography Color Negative 400

CN

400

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

 

Lomography Color Negative 800

CN

800

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

 

Lomography Color Tiger

CN

200

110-24, 3 × 110-24

 

Lomography Lobster RedScale

CN

50-200

110-24

Creative colour negative film with strong yellow-red shades at ISO 200 and weaker at ISO 50

Lomography Peacock

CD

200

110-24, 3 × 110-24

Colour slide film (process E-6)

Lomography Lobster RedScale XR50-200

CN

50-200

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

Such as Lobster RedScale

Lomography XPRO 200Slide

CD

200

3 × 135-36, 3 × 120

Colour film (process E-6), originally produced by AgfaPhoto for aerial photography, can also be cross-developed (process C-41)

Washi X400

CN

400

135-24

Unmasked colour negative film, very good for black-and-white prints and also for reversal development (process E-6)

 

Lupus Imaging & Media (DE)

AgfaPhoto
APX 100 New

SW

100

135-36, 30.5m

Manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB)

AgfaPhoto
APX 400 New

SW

400

135-36, 30.5m

Manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB)

AgfaPhoto
CT Precisa 100

CD

100

135-36

Made in Japan

AgfaPhoto
Vista plus 200

CN

200

135-24, 3 × 135-24, 135-36, 3 × 135-36

Made in Japan

AgfaPhoto
Vista plus 400

CN

400

135-24, 135-36

Made in Japan

 

Maco Photo Products (DE)

Agfa Copex Rapid

SW

KA

135-36, 120

Thin film, microfilm, resolution up to line pairs/mm (with Contrast 1000: 1), can also be developed for slide film (Agfa Scala
Process),

CFP Double X200

SW

200

135-36

High resolution film, normal development

JCH Street Pan 400

SW

400

135-36, 5x120

Double layer film with enhanced red sensitivity, high storage stability (probably Agfa-Gevaert, Belgium)

PAN 400

SW

400

127

Ilford HP5 film

ReraChrome

CD

100

127

New in the assortment for 4 × 4 cm shots with corresponding roll film cameras

ReraPan

SW

100

127

For 4 × 4 cm recordings with corresponding roll film cameras

Rollei ATO Supergraphic 2.1

SW

Ca 25

120, 4x5 "-12x16"

Orthochromatic lithographic film with strong contrast for reproductions of drawings and fonts (with Rollei RLC developer)

Rollei ATP 1.1.

SW

32-64

5 × 120

Very high-resolution Advanced Technical Pan Film (up to 900 line pairs / mm at contrast 1000: 1, on PET underlay, muted blue sensitive, red-sensitive up to 70 nm, depending on the developer IS0 32 to 64), for reproductions of fonts and drawings (with Repro Developer Rollei RHC) or for pictorial photography (with developer ATP DV / AB), also developed for slide film, produced by Agfa-Gevaert (B)

Rollei Blackbird

SW

100

135-36

Suitable for scanning

Rolleichrome CR 200

CD

200

135-36, 120

On PET base, resembles the former Agfachrome RSXII 200 Professional film, 2017 will expire

Rolli Chrome CR 320

CD

320

135-36, 120

A new film in preparation, acetate backing, replaces the CR 200

Rollei Crossbird

CD

200

120

Creative film for color-negative slides alienated by cross-development (process C-41) or for supervisory images with hard contrasts

Rollei Digibase CN 200

CN

200

135-36, 120

Unmasked colour negative film on PET support,
Also good for pictures on black and white photo paper
Suitable, processing in the process C-41, formerly manufactured by AgfaPhoto for aerial photographs, runs out

Rollei Infrared 400S

SW

200-400

135-36, 5x135-36, 120, 30.5m, 70mmx30.5m DP, 4x5 "

Red-sensitive up to 795 nm, without a filter like a panchromatic film, can be developed with PET support, also for slide film

Rollei Ortho 25

SW

25

135-36, 120, 4x5 "-8x10", meterware 35mm 10m and 30.5m, 70mm 15m (unperforated)

High contrast orthochromatic film (when processed in the Rollei RHC developer)

Rollei Redbird

CN

CN

135-36

Creative film with fire red shades when exposed to ISO 200 and cool blue shades at ISO 50, process C-41

Rollei Retro 80S

SW

80

135-36, 120, 5x120, 17m, 30.5m

Original aerial film on PET base, produced by Agfa-Gevaert (B)

Rollei Retro 400S

SW

400

135-36, 120, 5x120, 17m, 30.5m

Superpanchromatic, on PET base, slightly tougher contrasts, as a small picture film for the slide film can be developed

Rollei RPX 25

SW

25

135-36, 120, 4x5 ", 17m, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film, manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB)

Rollei RPX 100

SW

100

135-36, 120, 5x135-36, 120, 5x120, 17m, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film, manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB)

Rollei RPX 400

SW

400

135-36, 5 × 135-36, 120, 5x120, 4x5 ", 17m, 30.5m

Classical panchromatic film, manufactured by Harman Technologies (GB)

Rollei Superpan 200

SW

200

135-36, 120, 5x120, 17m, 30.5m

Superpanchromatic, on PET support, up to 750 nm red-sensitive, manufactured by Agfa-Gevaert, recommended for reversal development for slide film

Vision Cinema Pro 50D

CN

50

135-24

Kodak Vision3 Cine-film 50D (Type 5203) are suitable for daylight, after removal of the black SEM layer for process C-41 (otherwise ECN-2)

Vision Cinema Pro 200T / 125D

CN

200

135-24

Corresponds to Kodak Vision3 Cine-film 200T (Type 5213) for artificial light. For daylight (with conversion filter) such as ISO 125, after removing the black SEM layer for process C-41 (otherwise ECN-2)

Vision Cinema Pro 250D

CN

250

135-24

Corresponds to Kodak Vision3 Cine-film 200T (Type 5207) for daylight. After removing the black SEM layer for process C-41 (otherwise ECN-2)

 

Minox (DE + USA)

Spy Film Delta 100

SW

100

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Ilford Delta corresponds to 100

Spy Film Delta 400

SW

400

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Corresponds to Ilford Delta 400

Spy Film Ectar 100

CN

400

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Corresponds to Kodak Professional Ektar 100

Spy Film Portra 400

CN

400

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Corresponds to Kodak Professional Portra 400

 

PFG FotoGroup (IT) Six Gates Films

Orwell 400

SW

400

135-24

Hand-filled Cine film

Senna 640

SW

640

135-24

Hand-filled Cine film

Vision Cinema Pro 50D

CN

50

135-24

See Maco

Vision Cinema Pro 100T

CN

100

135-24

Corresponds to the Kodak Vision Cine-film 100T no longer produced in artificial light, after removal of the black SEM layer for process C-41 (otherwise ECN-2)

Vision Cinema Pro 200T

CN

200

135-24

See Maco

Vision Cinema Pro 250D

CN

250

135-24

See Maco

Vision Cinema Pro 500T

CN

500

135-24

Corresponds to Kodak Vision3 Cine-film for artificial light (Type 5219), to be exposed to daylight (with conversion filter) as ISO 320, after removal of the black SEM layer for process C-41 (otherwise ECN-2)

Wells 50

CN

500

135-24

Hand-filmed Kinofilm, very fine-grained

 

Minox films - Perrot Image SA

Film for Minox SW-100

SW

100

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Blue Moon Camera (USA)

Film for Minox SW-400

SW

400

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Blue Moon Camera (USA)

Film for Minox Color 100

CN

100

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Blue Moon Camera (USA)

Film for Minox Color 400

CN

400

1 × 36 8x11mm (Minox format)

Blue Moon Camera (USA)

 

Revolog (AT)

460nm

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with colour shifts from blue-violet to yellow-green depending on film development and scanning software

600nm

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with slightly bluish-green or reddish effect depending on the film development and scanning software

Kolor

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with colourful colour shifts over the whole picture

Lazer

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with bright blue and green lines in the picture

Plexus

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with bluish structure over the picture

Rasp

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with fine colourful lines in the picture

Streak

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with fibre-like scratch structure in darker image parts

Tesla I

CN

200

135-24

Creative film with bluish-white flashes in the picture

Tesla II

CN

200

135-24

Creative film with red lightning in the picture

Texture

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with a bubble-like structure

Volvox

CN

200

135-36

Creative film with green dots and spots in the picture

 

Trace Photochemistry (DE)

Orthopan UR

SW

6-12

135-36, 120

(800 line pairs / mm at contrast 1000: 1) thin film document film, also in kits with the
Improved track Nanospeed SL developer, is equivalent to Agfa Copex
HDP microfilm can also be developed for slide film

Track DSX

SW

25-50

135-36, 120

High-resolution (600 line pairs / mm at contrast 1000: 1) thin-film document film, also available in kits with the improved Spur Dokuspeed SL developer, Agfa Copex Rapid, microfilm, can also be developed for slide film

 

Wittner Cinetec (DE)

Wittner Chrome 200D

CD

200

135-36

On PET underlay, produced as an aerial film still by AgfaPhoto, similar to the previous Agfachrome RSXII 200 Professional film, runs out

 

Key:

Type: film type with the following abbreviations:

CD

Colour slide film

CN

Colour negative film

COD

Colour instant image

SSB

Black and white instant film

SW

Black-and-white film

NOTE:

See explanatory notes

   

Format:

110

Pocket cassette for recording 13 x 17 mm

120

Roll film for recordings in the format 6 x 6 cm, 6 x 9 cm or 4.5 x 6 cm

127

Roll film for recordings in the format 4 x 6,5 cm, 4 x 4 cm or 3 x 4 cm

135

Small format film (main format 24 x 36 mm) with offered film length (eg 135-36 = 36 exposures) and multiple film packs (eg 3 × 135-24)

Bulk 17m, 30.5m

35 mm small film or 70mm film with indication of length (17 or 30.5 metres in length)

Cm and "(inch)

Sheet films in the specified formats

   
 

Original Compilation by Gert Koshofer, DGPh           Original Illustrations by Ronald Vedrilla

Permalink
3rd January 2017

LPL 7452 Review

LPL 7452 Review

We're indebted to our friend, Ed Buziak, for his Blog reprint from 1998.

Large, Precise and Likeable

First, I’m thinking it may be useful for recently converted traditional film users to have the occasional equipment review to help them make one of the most important decisions on equipping their darkrooms. Having said that, what can more one say about an enlarger that’s basically a pleasure to use, looks great and has no vices. In more than a few words… plenty! Although there are a couple of minor niggles, the only immediate problem you could have with this enlarger is how to lift and fit the boxes into your vehicle (or truck) after you’ve bought one.

Large the LPL 7452 certainly is… laborious to use it certainly isn’t. This beast is one of the nicest enlargers I’ve ever used mainly because of two features… (a) it has a perfectly counter-balanced head which can be raised or lowered with the touch of your little finger, and (b) the fine-focus control with its 5-to-1 gearing is low enough to tweak the magnified image of grain in and out of focus a couple of times before settling on the precise focus setting.

Construction

Although earlier models of LPL’s 5×4 enlarger shared a column design and size with the smaller 7700 series (which says much for the 7700’s rigidity) the later 7451 and current 7452 models (also previously marketed as the Saunders 4500 in the USA) have a considerably stronger support with a 90x110mm extruded aluminum column bolted to a steel channel reinforced 25mm (1 inch) thick baseboard. Whilst the baseboard has ample dimensions at 600x600mm (2×2 feet) it has to be positioned 60mm from a wall in order to allow free movement of the head. This may cause problems in darkrooms which have standard 600mm deep worktops, as I had during the review period, because the enlarger’s two front shock-absorbent feet are positioned too far forward… although a pre-assembly tweak with a drill and screwdriver could reposition them to your own needs. An alternative to this (and you would need a very solid, vibration-free darkroom wall) would be to use the proper wall-mounting brackets.

The stove enameled matt-black enlarger head and its carriage are fabricated from cast aluminum and sheet steel. Like many enlargers nowadays the 7452 is “modular” and can be adapted to other uses and formats with accessories. You simply purchase what you need initially and add further bits and pieces as required later.

Although the two previous models were available as plain “black-and-white” enlargers the 7452 was only supplied (in Europe, as far as I knew) with a Color or Variable Contrast module. But even if you are primarily a monochrome worker it is probably a good idea to purchase the Color version… so utilising the yellow and magenta filters for your multigrade monochrome printing.

If you know that you will never want to do color printing then the VCCE (Variable Contrast Constant Exposure) module is not only the cheaper option but the more user-friendly of the two. The VCCE’s built-in filters are calibrated for both Ilford Multigrade and Kodak Polycontrast enlarging papers so that prints can be made at any grade without having to recalculate basic exposure times (although recalculation does have to be made when using the hardest grades 4 to 5). A single knob is used to dial-in grades as fine as one quarter or less… exposures being kept constant by a built-in compensating neutral density (N.D.) filter.

Not so hot news

Any 5 x 4 color enlarger has to have a bright light source and mixing chamber in order to illuminate a large negative area evenly and to make enlarging times reasonably short. The 24v/250w ELC quartz-halogen lamp used here results in 1-stop of extra light output and some extra heat. Although the cooling system has been redesigned on the 7452 (the fan ducting has been modified to improve efficiency and the wiring circuit has been changed so that it is impossible to switch the light source on without the enlarger’s fan being on) there is still a certain amount of heat generated and transmitted.

In fact this heat transfer was so noticeable that I took measurements inside the negative stage to compare the rise and fall in temperature over a period of use that would be deemed normal but not excessive. After being switched-on for 30 secs the space where the negative would be had risen by only 0.5 degrees C… but after 5 minutes the temperature had gone up by 40 degrees C… more than enough to “pop” a negative in a glassless carrier. With the fan remaining on, but the enlarger lamp off, the thermometer probe took 20 minutes to return to the ambient temperature of my darkroom.

This is perhaps not an unexpected result considering the wattage of the lamp but I think it means that the glass negative carrier should be specified when ordering the basic enlarger. Interestingly, the “popping” problem was encountered only with thin emulsion / base 35mm negatives. Both 120 roll and 5×4 inch sheet films didn’t show any effects of the rise in temperature, no doubt due to their thicker support base. I realize that a 5 minute exposure can’t be considered normal usage but if an accumulation of rapidly made exposures, in a multiple printing situation for example, started to approach 5 minutes I would be concerned about the stability and focus of the negative.

Center Stage

Another 7452 modification has positioned the lamphouse unit 63mm further away from the enlarger’s column. When making large 24×16 inch (60×40 cms) prints from full frame 35mm negatives the enlarger’s head was at the top of the 1350mm column but my Beard masking easel, even with its 3 inch wide frame, was still 3 inches away from the column base. Using a 150mm Nikkor enlarging lens with a 5×4 negative for a slightly smaller print size had the same result… a 3 inch stand-off between easel and column.

Curiosity aroused. I went from two extremes to an average and fully projected a 6x7cm negative. Ah! The reason for the box-like extension became clear… it allowed a full 29×23 inch (74×58.5 cms which is also an odd size in metric!) enlargement from ideal-format roll-film negatives.

Of course the down side to this handy provision is that standard 10×8 prints, which most of us make much of the time, need a 16×12 masking easel (certainly a Beard 2-blade easel which was and probably still is a very popular item) to be positioned about 7 inches away from the column and 6 inches overlapping the front edge of the enlarger’s baseboard. If the 7452’s extension box was an optional extra I could understand its validity… but it came as part of the overall package so I chose to unbolt it… the last thing you want in a “dark” environment are annoying quirks and niggles with basic equipment.

Controls

In action the 7452 reminded me slightly, and fondly, of a submarine. Schoolboy visits to these warships in Manchester Docks in the late 1950s and early 1960s were always a thrill – the gentle hum of machinery, lights glowing in the dimness, the sight of polished brass, the smell of cleaning rags… and the up-down smoothness of the periscope as well as its range-finder sights focusing.

Back in the darkroom this is what the LPL does well. Height elevation and locking is almost “power assisted” in feel whilst the coarse and fine-focus knobs, combined with the bright light from the quartz-halogen lamp, make accurate focus with any negative spot-on. In fact it’s quite easy using a good grain magnifier to focus a negative with the enlarging lens at its optimum setting of 2-stops down… so avoiding the possibility of any potential focus shift when changing to the printing aperture.

The color module incorporates stepless Yellow (0-200), Magenta (0-170) and Cyan (0-200) dichroic filters which are adjusted by large control knobs with adjacent dials giving clear back-lit readings. The standard “white light” lever removes the filters from the light path without changing their settings – useful for clearer framing – and a switchable light attenuator is provided to cut the transmitted light by approximately 2-stops in case the image is so clear that exposure times become unmanageably short.

Monochrome

The optional Variable Contrast Constant Exposure module can be interchanged with the Color module in seconds. Only one dial and scale is necessary in order to establish paper grades, or even quarters of a grade. The light attenuator also operates with this module and proved to be “in” more than it was “out” during the test period, so bright was the enlarger’s light source!

Something I noticed with this equipment (although it was more of a problem with lamps) was the time taken for the quartz-halogen’s light to fully extinguish. Calculating that the afterglow lasted for about 0.25 seconds the peak output would probably not be reached for 0.25 sec either. The effect becomes a problem when, for example, a 10 sec print exposure is judged to be right from the culmination of ten 1 sec test-strip exposures. It will of course be found that the test print will be overexposed because the correct exposure should have been in the region of 8 seconds.

Conclusion

All in all the LPL 7452 is one of the best enlargers of its type and one which I would have bought for myself had my darkroom not been fully equipped at the time with a Durst Laborator L1200 Multigraph. At a recommended retail price in the mid- to late 1990s of around £1750 (+VAT) it was not cheap for an amateur… but one would have been able to find much better “street” prices at around 33% discount from professional dealers such as Firstcall Photographic Limited in the UK or from across the pond in America where LPL enlargers were marketed under the “Saunders” brand and where excellent deals at stores such as B&H Photo Video in New York would have reduced the listed figure considerably. It was (and still may be) best to think of the LPL 7452 as a “once-in-a-lifetime” investment rather than a cost because it was both a quality enlarger and a wise purchase. And, make sure you ask a friend to help load and unload it from your vehicle… a large box weighing over 30 kilos is very awkward to handle by yourself!

BTW: The name initials “LPL” stand for “Little Penguin Limited” which was the quaint original name for the company… and their logo was a little penguin.

Image & text © 1998 Ed Buziak.

Permalink
3rd November 2016

Our Film of The Year 2016

Our Film of The Year 2016

This film is our nomination for Film of The Year 2016. Manufactured in France, by an artisan filmmaker, Washi S is in all respects very different to your average "Corporation" film.

"S" stands for sound, as it starts its life principally used by motion picture professionals for sound recording. But then Washi adapt this slightly orthochromatic film (up to 620 nm) and the result is a very fine grain, ultra high definition black and white film whose results are simply stunning.

It is also very sharp too, guaranteed by a special anti-halation layer located between the film's base and the emulsion layer while it's usually in the back layer for ordinary films.

Social media is in raptures about the " obscene amounts of contrast you get when you shoot "S" film". Some film photographers have never seen such silky black results in a monochrome film and are bowled over by it.

Our suggestion for exposure is rated at 50 ISO (you can go as high as 80) use with a yellow or orange filter if desired and process then scan or print to impress. For developing, we used Ilford Ilfotec LC29 at 1+19 for 12 minutes.

While looking at reviews there is a great sample album on Flikr from FranekN. We're indebted to him for these sample pictures.  http://bit.ly/2flEyBD


Available now in 35mm singles from £3.60 or £42 for the 30-metre length.

Permalink
27th October 2016

What equipment do I need for processing colour film at home?

What equipment do I need for processing colour film at home?

One of the most frequently asked questions that we get in our office is:
"What equipment do I need for processing colour film at home?"

With most users, then going straight to scan after development, this is the creative way in producing your own colour film images.

There are two main requirements to consider when processing your colour film:
1) You need to maintain temperature during processing at 38 degrees C.
2) The loading of the film (but not the actual processing) should be done in complete darkness.

So here is our advisory list of the items you will need with current prices as at the end of October 2016.

Shopping List:
 
21014    FP Film Processor     £259.95      
25044    Paterson Force Film Washer     £12.39      
26031    Firstcall Spirit Thermometer     £5.99      
70004    Firstcall 2520 Triple Clock Timer     £13.27      
26112    AP Chemical Mixer, Set of 2    £9.98      
26045    AP Film Clips (2)     £6.59      
26096    AP Film & Print Squeegee     £8.99      
25031    Paterson Measuring Cylinder Funnel, 11cm     £6.29
26022    Paterson Measuring Cylinder 45ml     £6.29      
26024    Paterson Measuring Cylinder 300ml      £7.69  
26026    Paterson Measuring Cylinder 600ml     £9.89
26028    Paterson Mixing Jug 1000ml    £8.99
83008    RH Designs Safelight, SafeTorch Colour    £23.90      
69005    Black-out Material (White) per metre (1.37m wide)    £6.62      
69001    Black-out Door Foam 12 metre roll    £8.49      
              
19002    Tetenal Colortec C-41 Rapid Negative Kit, 1 litre for 8 films    £29.70                     

Total outlay £425.02  including VAT  

The Nova FP Film Processor. Mains temperature and is complete with 3 bottles and Paterson Universal film tank and temperature controller. One universal film reel/spool included  to process 2x 35mm film or 1x 120.

So there you have it. For under £430 you too can process your own colour films at home and have great fun doing so.

Everything is customizable so give us a call or email to discuss your personal requirements on 01823 413007.

Permalink
26th October 2016

Cyanotype Fabrics Capture Creative Child Award!

Cyanotype Fabrics Capture Creative Child Award!


Jacquard Products is proud to announce that their Cyanotype Fabrics were awarded the 2016 Creative Child Product of the Year Award!


Cyanotype is a photographic printmaking process that is so simple, even children can enjoy professional-quality results. We believe it is a fantastic way to introduce children to the magic of science, photography, nature and art, and the panel of educators, mothers and professionals at Creative Child Magazine wholeheartedly agree!


Lessons from a 6 yr old: Cyanotype Mural Fabric

Cyanotype Fabric is a wonderful and engaging project for any group--think birthday parties, day camps, classrooms, sports teams, etc.--and it is portable enough to take on hikes or to the beach. Offered in 8.5" x 11" sheets or a 5' x 7' mural size, Cyanotype Fabric is great for kids who want to make their own one-of-a-kind prints, or for groups of children working collaboratively together. We even offer a Class Pack for groups of 30 or more. Children can make prints of their favourite toys, capture full-body forms or explore beautiful shapes found in nature: leaves, shells, stones, branches, flowers, etc. Every subtlety and shadow will be captured in the print!


Andrea Bergart led cyanotype workshops with children in Senegal.

Check out the gallery here!


The Cyanotype printmaking process is not only super fun, it is also an excellent educational opportunity: it teaches creativity, resourcefulness, teamwork and patience, and it ties in extremely well with lessons on science, history, art, technology, and the power of the sun.

Cyanotype Pretreated Fabric Sheets
8.5" x 11"/216 mm x 279 mm sheets of cotton sateen fabric
- 10 Sheet Pack (Item JCY1110), £17.59
- 30 Sheet Pack (Item JCY1130), £35.19
For ages 8+

Cyanotype Pretreated Mural Fabric
1 panel of 5' x 7'/1.52m x 2.13m cotton sateen fabric (Item JCY1105)
£52.79
For ages 8+

For more information, visit http://www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk/search/cyanotype or call Customer Service 01823 413007

Permalink
12th October 2016

Silvershotz Magazine

Silvershotz Magazine

We are proud to announce that this contemporary photography magazine is now available for subscription through Firstcall.

It has quickly become the world's market leader in making the transition from a printed magazine to an online, interactive, dynamic magazine experience for those passionate about photography.

Silvershotz beautifully showcases the best photographic images from around the world with the curatorial selections being made by experienced editors to ensure international standards are achieved.

While reading it, you can immerse yourself in beautiful images and be inspired by themed and conceptual portfolios, plus in-depth interviews, book reviews, and videos.

The interactive content allows you to share images on Facebook and vote for your favourite photographer in each edition. The Top 15 photographers each year, as voted by you, are included in our Annual print edition.

We consider the magazine to be the missing link between the printed page and internet searches, making for a subscription service where you can access more than 7000 pages of content, 700 portfolios, 150 book reviews and hundreds of technical articles from film and darkroom through to digital and inkjet.

Learn more and see the images in this short Vimeo introductory video:

https://vimeo.com/186272695?utm_source=email&utm_medium=vimeo-cliptranscode-201504&utm_campaign=28749

There are two types of subscription:

1)    Educational Establishment Licence. Designed for Visual Arts Educators, this multi-use licence service allows a number of students access to the full service of monthly magazines, content pages, portfolios, reviews and articles for a 12 month calendar year. Any computer on campus can then obtain access via the institution's IP address that is provided during the registration.
This subscription costs:
   £125 inc VAT per year for up to 50 students
   £175 inc VAT per year for 51 to 99 students
   £295 inc VAT per year for 100+ students

2)    Single User License. A platinum service for single person use. This could be a teacher, student or hobbyist. Once logged in, the same access to content resources applies as per multi-user.
This subscription costs £25 inc VAT per year.

How to proceed:
There is a 30-day free trial for you to view back editions of 700 + portfolios, 150 book reviews and hundreds of technical articles,plus this month's magazine. To do this, there is an App which contains the content. However, you must create a FREE account first before you view the content. Click https://app.silvershotz.com/#!signup to create your account.

Alternatively, you can proceed with your full order, buying either membership on this online page, providing us with your IP address in the delivery address box part of the order form. We will then activate your membership via the subscription department for you.

If you proceed with an Educational Establishment Licence, unlimited access to the magazine could be as little as £2.95 per student, per year.

Permalink
3rd August 2016

How to teach children photography as it would be pure magic!

How to teach children photography as it would be pure magic!

 We're indebted to our friend Borut Peterlin who details his workshop with 8 year olds. We have an empathy with his thoughts and are happy to reproduce his findings.

Read the section on understanding light and the relationship between physics and chemistry as seen through the eyes of a child. It will make you smile and remember just how magical analogue photography is.

 

As you probably know I have done many workshops in my life, I even started and running a festival ofdocumentary photography Fotopub for eight years. Even now I still have a workshop at least one every month. This week I had a workshop in elementary school for 8 year olds as a volunteer. Because I had many workshops for kids of different ages and tried different approaches, so in this post I will share with you the most effective way to introduce children to photography.

For children up to age of ten my workshop has three sages. First to present photography as a kind of magic, but a real magic, not a cheap trick!  Secondly they have to do the magic by themselves and most importantly to bring something home to show their parents “the proof” they were actually making magic!

Simple? It is! There are many ways to do it, but let me show you how I’m doing it. Firstly I ask if somebody in this room has ever take any photograph? You always want to start with simple question, something that everybody thinks, oh, I can do this! The next one has to be a tricky one. Can you make your own telephone with a camera?

Then I explain that photography in its principle is very simple process, very much like cooking. And we all know that cooking is kind of magic, how else can our mothers transform carrot, that we all know it is inedible and horrible into such a delicious soup?

… and today we will do just that, we will do magic! I hand them “the magic paper”, which is basically plain silver-gelatin photo paper. They lay on it a leaf (they had a homework to bring a leaf) and press it with a piece of glass. Few minutes later they already notice that the paper is turning dark-blue colour. Of course I tell them not to touch it, we will look the lumen print on the very end! (Jill Enfield on Lumen Prints)

Then we go outside and everybody looks trough a view camera and notice that the image is flipped upside down and that although their colleagues all have right hand in the air, through camera it appears that they are waving with left arm!  How could that be?

I ask them if somebody has ever seen the inside of a mobile phone or digital camera and always there is one kid (always a boy) that has seen whole lot of wires, cables, chips and other electronic stuff.

Then I ask if they want to see the inside of my camera, the old view bellow camera? Do you want to know the secret why is the projected image on the focusing screen turned up-side down and left to right? And everybody is getting so excited, but then I cover the camera with a black cloth, take away the lens, take away the focusing screen, look under the black cloth and make a silly face, being surprised what have I found out, then I remove the cloth and reach with my hand trough the camera.

They do not understand how is this possible that small mobile phone has so much electronics, whereas my large-format camera has only empty space. I explain them that the magic force in action is called physics! And the other magic force that record the photograph is called chemistry and let me show you how it works. I pull out of my pocket a film holder, we make a group picture. In the classroom I put the film in developing tank and ask one student to pour developer and the other to wipe any leak drops and take care of the timer.

I repeat that the photography is in its essence a very simple process and I take a candy-box and explain that this is a camera. Everybody laughs, but it is real camera obscure. We go in a tent, that is my mobile darkroom, load a pice of ordinary silver-gelatin paper and expose it on the window. We develop an image and sky is black, whereas a tree is white! How can that be, I ask?

We look at “the magic paper” with tree leaf on them on their desks and notice that the paper became dark. Why did it became dark, I ask? They are struggling with the concept that it became dark because it was exposed to the light. Then I ask them if it became dark because the paper was exposed to dark? No, in the classroom, light was turned on all the time. They came to a conclusion that it was actually the light that made the paper go dark! Then I ask them to look out of the window and ask which is brighter the sky or the tree and of course in reality the sky is bright and the tree is dark, whereas in the photograph we made with the candy-box camera obscure is just the opposite. They know the answer why it is so. Now it’s time to learn the new word: A NEGATIVE!

Meanwhile we developed and fixed the film of our group photo. We anxiously open the developing tank and long and behold, the photograph is actually a negative one! I say in amazement, that this can not be their photograph, since there are only black people on the film! Of course they recognise themselves, but I ask them how come they have black faces on the film? One bright kid (usually girl) explains that we are looking the same thing as it was the tree image from the candy-box. Correct, what is the name for it? The negative!

We speed dry the negative with a hairdryer and then we make a contact copy in the darkroom. It is great because the first contact-copy photographs are either too bright or too dark, but then we adjust exposure and the last prints are perfect! Why were those prints too bright? How did we solve it later?

There is another test while exposing. I say I will time 20 seconds with my watch while they count twenty seconds quietly. When they will think the 20 seconds has passed, they say twenty loudly! Then some of them are saying twenty too soon, some are too late, some are actually exact, but the result is not important, it’s important that they have a challenge how long does 20 seconds take. And keep the focus:-)

After we develop the prints we are having a laugh how we look like. One photograph taken is a serious posture and the second one is a funny one.

At the end they go to their lumen prints that were exposing for an hour and a half and they see a beautiful photogram of a leaf. The photogram is still light sensitive, there is not enough time to fix and dry all of them, so they take the photogram home in their school-book, hidden away from daylight. At home they can show it to parents, but the photogram will eventually become totally dark. It is a magic paper nevertheless!

We finish the workshop with really hard questions for them. Like why is the paper sensitive to white light, but not to red light? I ask them if they can describe the spectrum of a rainbow, but in a correct order. On the end I say that red is at one side of the spectrum, blue and violet is on the other. I say one has more energy then the other, which one has greater energy red or blue colour? After few more suggestive questions we all come to conclusion that red light has less energy then white light, that is why the photo-sensitive paper, or our “magic paper” is not sensitive to red light. Then I ask them if they ever heard about infrared light? No, they have not. We can not see, smell, taste or hear infrared light, but we have a sense to feel it. How can we feel infrared light? (it’s heat of course) I finish with explaining that light is amazing energy and what we see is very very tiny part of the rainbow. I’m ending that there are infrared cameras that can see a person trough a wall! Just like Superman! I told you we will be talking about the real magic!

And this is how my one a half hour workshop for kids ends. That was on Wednesday.


 

In October and November I had 12 hour (six times 2 hours) long workshop for kids from 11 to 15 years. Our goal was to make 12 images for calendar that will be published in local newspaper Vrelec. I think this post is too long already, so let me just summarise how our workflow differed. First of all there was no analog photography, just digital photography with their cameras. I had one digital SLR with me, so the kid that had to photograph with a phone, suddenly had the best camera in the group. The first lesson was on observing. We walked down to the river  and observe a particular stone in the river from one side, the other side and observing how is the scene changing. Where is the sky, how does the background changes, how does perspective changes, etc. From one point of view sones were backed by branches, whereas from the other point of view we did see a perspective of a river stream in first plane, stones in the middle and sky in the back. Trees were on opposite banks, making nice framing.

About this workshop let me tell you that we learned a lot about postprocessing and Lightroom and Photoshop. Because we had only one computer, the others were bored, so I gave them a task to photograph a drop of milk. I will not explain you how have we done it, we did it very simple, that one person triggered the camera, the other person dropped the drop and with the other hand triggered a handheld speed light flash. But HEREare tons of videos on the subject.

Permalink
10th June 2016

How Has Digital Photography Changed the World?

How Has Digital Photography Changed the World?

 

While digital photography may not seem life-changing, it has had a heavy role in adjusting the world in which we all live. Digital photography has added new elements to the technological, artistic, and emotional experiences of taking and viewing pictures. Here are some ways that digital photography has changed the world.

 

We Can Truly Experience the Moment Even if We Weren’t There

There was a time when the only way to experience a moment was to hear about it from someone or read about it long after it happened. These days, thanks to digital photography, I have the luxury of living in the moment. Someone across the world can upload an image to the Internet, and I can indulge in their experience seconds later. This also leaves room for my own interpretation of what has been captured in the picture, as well as my own emotional involvement. Another neat thing about technology in photography is that  I can see pictures in digital picture frames, for example, and be told an entire story through real life images alone.  For me, digital photography is magical.      

 

Photography is Cheaper Than It Used to Be

Film used to be a mandatory part of photography. Now, because of digital photography, photographers have the choice to opt out of it.  As a result, I don’t have to spend my money on film anymore unless I want to, and instead, I can directly upload my photos to my computer.  Not only is this a cheaper method of photography, but it is also more efficient. Uploading pictures to the computer is far quicker and easier than developing them.  Digital photography has provided the gifts of affordability and efficiency. 

 

Now Anyone Can Be a Photographer

Photographers used to be trained professionals, but now, as a result of digital photography, anyone can take pictures anywhere and at any time. In other words, anyone can call themselves a photographer. This means that our world has more photos floating around it than ever before, and so more special moments in nature and in life are being shared amongst ourselves. Additionally, more perspectives and experiences are being added to the modern photography canon. Living in a world where anyone can become a photographer is truly spectacular.

 

Preserving History Just Became Easier

I always see these painted portraits of ancient monarchs and think about how far we’ve come since those old days.  That was how they preserved history, and digital photography is how we save our memories for the people of the future. Every picture of every person, animal, plant, meal, etc. that we take goes down in history and paints the bigger picture of what people in our time period were like. Generations from now, these photos that we take are how they are going to remember people like you and me.  People of the future are going to find our cameras, our pictures, our digital photo albums, and our digital photo frames absolutely fascinating.

 

The Detail Each Picture Has is Awe-Inspiring

 

Whenever I find photos from decades ago I am always amazed by the difference in photo quality from then up until now. These days, I find that I am lucky to be able to see something stunning and capture it just as it is on my camera. We take this for granted, but this was not necessarily an advantage we had before digital photography came along; I truly find it amazing what digital photography is capable of doing. From a person’s glowing skin to a cold raindrop, digital photography captures it all and allows us to experience the extravagant detail long after the moment has passed.

 

There is more to photography than just taking pictures and looking at them afterwards: photography is an art and an experience.  Photography allows us to live vibrant, colorful lives from our living room couch, and to experience the stories of other people and living creatures, diverse places, and Mother Nature herself.

 

Without digital photography, we would not have the opportunity to find the high level of accuracy in our photos that we currently have, and therefore, we would lose valuable parts of important memories. We would lose parts of ourselves, and parts of our lives. Therefore, I must thank digital photography for all that it does for me. When I take a step back and look at life, I realize that digital photography really and truly has changed the world, one picture at a time.

 

Author Bio:

Ami Sanghvi is a creative writer and currently writes content on behalf of the digital picture frame experts at Nixplay. In her spare time, she can be found writing poetry, reading, or sketching. Tweet her @AmiJSanghvi or connect with her on LinkedIn.

Permalink
9th May 2016

Choosing the right photographic equipment for a safari

Choosing the right photographic equipment for a safari

bay elephant

In April I was fortunate to go an my first African safari with Audley Travel. The safari involved a mixed river boat excursion on the River Chobe (Namibia and Botswana) and a land-based private reserve to Pyndha in South Africa.


Chobe Princess Riverboat& Beyaond Game Vehicle

Of course, everyone wants to come back with memorable photos from such a trip and with plentiful sunshine, most digital (or film) cameras will give you a fair chance of having a good portfolio. The problem is how to get close enough to come home with stunning photos that you’ll want to share.

Don’t forget the binoculars

Vanguard Spirit ED2 8x42 Binoculars

As a photographic retailer, no one understands the importance of a quality image more than Firstcall, however the most important optical equipment on your safari is not a camera – but a good pair of quality binoculars. We have access to all the major camera brand  binoculars, but I settled on the Vanguard Spirit ED 8x42 binoculars, after research, because they produce outstanding light transmission and superior low light performance whether on a dawn or dusk game drive. Their advanced lens and prism design with Japanese ED glass means you’ll get up-close and personal with nature and they’re light enough to not worry about carrying around with you. At around £200 they’ll be great for normal use when you get home too.

Weight and see

Carmine Bee Eater

Cheetah at dawn

Being a mixed safari, the task of selecting the right camera equipment was never going to be easy. River boat excursions are famous for exotic bird sightings yet take too powerful a lens combination for land-based safaris meaning you could end up being too close. A multiple number of lenses can also add to the weight you carry – a factor important not only for your posture and comfort but also for airline cabin baggage reasons.

Compact camera or SLR

Fuji FinePix S1 Bridge Camera

The most important selection is therefore the lens(es) that you use with your camera to get those telephoto shots. If you use a digital compact camera you may be tempted to use a camera with a long zoom lens built-in. We often call these cameras “bridge” models because they bridge the gap between a normal compact camera and an SLR (single lens reflex) interchangeable lens model. It’s not uncommon to find them with an optical zoom with a range of 24mm–1200mm like the Fuji FinePix S1. These cameras will get you close enough, but often fall down on stabilisation and therefore picture sharpness – especially noticeable in bird pictures.


Canon 70D with Sigma 18-300mm

The best option then is to choose an SLR camera. It doesn’t really matter which make you choose. Most SLR cameras come with a “standard” 18-55mm short zoom lens included. The natural inclination is then to add to this range by buying a telephoto lens to take with you. Typically this would be a 70-300mm lens and this would be your cheapest option for any safari holidaymaker. While 300mm gets you close enough for most eventualities there are many shots where you just need to be that bit closer – i.e. the bird in a far-off tree or a big cat eating their kill in the morning light.

Our recommendation of SLR camera lenses

Sigma 150-600mm lensGiraffes at dawn

With the caveat above, we decided the most important lens to take would be one that extended that 300mm range, yet one that was light enough to hand hold. The perfect lens to choose here is therefore the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS. Coupled to this we opted for not the “standard” lens given with the camera, but a new “all-round” accompanying lens which was the Sigma 18-300mm f3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS. Both lenses are optically stabilized, giving you pin-sharp pictures even when your game vehicle is bumping around the terrain. Remember, there’s no space for a tripod when you’re in a game vehicle so everything needs to be hand-held.

Also, don’t forget a flashgun. At dawn or dusk game drives, it’s really useful to have a little added flash power to capture heavily camouflaged animals like baboons in trees. We took a Sigma EF 610 with its zoom and bounce facility which automatically links to the camera’s TTL metering system which makes flash photography a breeze.

How to store and carry your equipment

Vanguard Adaptor 48 BackpackVanguard Adaptor 48 Backpack open

This is almost as important as the equipment selection. You need a camera bag that’ll protect your valuable equipment  yet be light enough to not be burdensome. We recommend the best bag we found which is the Vanguard Adaptor 48. It’s a backpack, which’ll hold all of the above recommend equipment. It’s well padded and even has a weatherproof cover if you get caught in showers. We used this complete backpack for our cabin baggage, but didn’t always take the complete bag with us on drives. With space at a premium, we also took a mini-shoulder bag, the Lowepro Nova 170AW. This was stowed away in our main luggage put used when the camera only needed the “all-round” 18-300mm lens, for instance in sightseeing or helicopter rides when taking the long telephoto lens would be inpractical.

In summary

Balck rhino at duskZebra Crossing

Just like with the other parts of your holiday, photographic equipment needs careful forethought and planning to make sure your pictures are memorable and the best quality attainable.
Finally, don’t come home from a safari without your two “trophy” shots. Ours were a black rhino (one of only 4000 left in the world) and just because we had to – a Zebra Crossing.

I hope our own experiences will be beneficial to all who read this blog.

Permalink
21st January 2016

This Book Is A Camera

This Book Is A Camera

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the best new product we've seen this year and we're not alone.

it was also described as one of the "most clever design objects" by Wired magazine.

This design project by Kelli Anderson, has made a working Pinhole camera from an educational pop-up book that combines the skills needed for design, science, structure and function.

The book explains—and actively demonstrates—how a structure as humble as a folded piece of paper can tap into the intrinsic properties of light to produce a photograph - and from March it will available from Firstcall.

The convex surface of the lens of a normal camera merges light beams from a varying angles to produce focus at the focal point. A lensless camera accepts light through a single hole in a flat plane (from a single angle.) Because of this, there are no mechanics to “focus” a pinhole camera—it is a projection from a single beam, much like a camera obscura. The result is that objects near the camera and objects far away from the camera have the same exact amount of focus.

The book itself comes with detailed instructions and a starter pack of B/W Ilford photo paper (any 4×5” or smaller light-sensitive material can be used). There is nothing to assemble, but if you want to use it as more than a book, you need to feel alright with the concept of pouring developer into an old takeout food container and sloshing it around in the dark… while counting.

 

http://kellianderson.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/samplephoto1.jpg

 

More information can be found on the KellieAnderson site.

We expect the retail price to be £30 including VAT. Email us with your interest and we'll keep you informed when we have our first shipment.

 

Permalink
« Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | Next »